Reading progress… update #2

I am really pleased with my progress thus far. I have devoured four novels and made a productive start with my morning reading.

Novels:

  • Dexter, Colin: The Dead of Jericho
  • Dexter, Colin: The Riddle of the Third Mile
  • Dexter, Colin: The Secret of Annexe 3
  • Dexter, Colin: The Wench is Dead

Morning reading:

  • Aurelius, Marcus: Meditations – Books 1 and 2
  • The Bible:
    • Romans
    • 1 Corinthians – Chapters 1-3
  • King, Stephen: On Writing((Each morning that I openned ‘On Writing‘, I was hooked and more than a bit frustrated when I had to put it down. Consequently, when I finished ‘The Wench is Dead’, I decided take a pause from reading novels and immerse myself in this, instead. For my morning reading, I have replaced it with ‘Unsubscribe‘ by Jocelyn K. Glei which is perfectly structured in to short essays.))
    • Forewords 1, 2 and 3
    • Chapter 1: CV – Parts 1-18
  • Russell, Bertrand: History of Western Philosophy – Preface and Introduction
  • Seneca: Dialogues and Essays – Introduction and Note on the Text

Morning Reading

A daily ritual that I have observed for several years now is to begin each day by reading from selected philosophical and theological texts. Last year, alongside revisiting the Stoics, I managed to give myself a grounding in Taoism, Confucianism and Buddhism. I supplemented these with some early Christian monasticism and the maxims of the 17th Century philosopher Baltasar Gracián.((Hat tip to Doug Belshaw for that one.))

  1. Aurelius, Marcus: Meditations (r(((r) Indicates ‘re-reading’.)))
  2. Confucius: The Analects
  3. Epictetus: Discourses and Selected Writings (r)
  4. Gracián, Baltasar: The Pocket Oracle and Art of Prudence
  5. Mascaro, Juan: The Dhammapada
  6. Seneca: Letters from a Stoic (r)
  7. Tzu, Lao: Tao Te Ching
  8. Walker, Brian Browne: Hua Hu Ching: The Unknown Teachings of Lao Tzu
  9. Ward, Benedicta: The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks

I have begun 2021 with fewer texts, covering a wider range of subjects and ideas. Alongside Aurelius and Seneca, I am going to re-read specific sections of the bible; take a broader look at Western philosophy((I feel that I have a firm understanding of Stoicism. And from sixteen years of teaching A-Level Literature and Media Studies, a sound understanding of more modern philosophies, particularly romanticism, modernism and post-modernism. My knowledge of various religions is good and I have a reasonable grounding in Eastern philosophies and theology but there are significant gaps in my understanding of Western philosophy. I hope that Bertrand Russell’s much lauded (and criticised) book can help begin to plug those gaps.)); and also read Stephen King’s ‘On Writing‘ which has been sitting unread in my Kindle Library for over a year. Not a philosophical text per se, but one that I hope will go some way to helping me achieve one of my goals for 2021.

  1. Aurelius, Marcus: Meditations (r)
  2. The Bible (NSV)
    • New Testament:
      • The Epistles of Paul
      • James’ Epistle
    • Old Testament:
      • Psalms
      • Proverbs
  3. King, Stephen: On Writing
  4. Russell, Bertrand: History of Western Philosophy
  5. Seneca: Dialogues and Essays