21st Century Literacy: Two Words

There are no films, TV programmes, advertisements, books, paintings or radio shows. Nor do we watch, observe, gaze, inspect, listen or study. There are only ‘texts’ which we ‘read’.

Sometimes the language we use in the classroom is peripheral, complicating meaning and/or understanding. After all, words such as ‘film’ and ‘advert’ are only generic terms, used to classify texts, in our dumbed down world, where we clamour to have everything fitted neatly into little boxes. Words such as ‘watch’ and ‘gaze’ do nothing more than describe states of being.

None of these terms are helpful in preparing young people to be literate in the 21st century. The values placed on texts such as ‘films’ and ‘TV programmes’, when combined with words such as ‘watch’ or ‘listen’, are predominantly negative. The implication being: ‘no reading is required’. However, any student of Media Studies, Communication Studies or Linguistics will tell you that, this is not true.

Moreover, children are being born into, and are growing up in a “media-saturated society” (Strinati, 1992) where the boundaries between high and low culture have been eroded almost entirely. This is a dangerous world in which young people are growing up. That is, if we don’t begin to treat supposed ‘lowbrow’ texts with the same critical reverence as we have paid to fine works of art, classical music and plays.

It is my contention, that we can take steps towards achieving this, by redefining (and using) just two words. Those words are ‘text’ and ‘reading’.

With my semiotic hat on, I would suggest:

  • Text: Any work containing one or more sign.
  • Reading: To decode the meaning within a text through the understanding of signs.

If we reduce our classroom language to these two terms and help our students to appreciate the above definitions then we can change the way they look at the world; opening their eyes to the depth of meaning that can be found within a Shakespeare play and Call of Duty. Moreover, we can remove hierarchal precepts and establish a level of equality, in which both (highbrow and lowbrow) texts are read (critically) not watched or played.

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James Michie

Husband, Educator, Writer, Runner...

3 thoughts on “21st Century Literacy: Two Words”

  1. James
    I was rather confused when I started “reading” this “text”, but as I read further I realized your point.  I think this brings up a good point that we are always processing information, no matter where it comes from.  In your text, you mentioned “lowbrow” text as opposed to “highbrow” text and I’m assuming that you are referring to text that requires concentration to decipher, when you say “lowbrow”, because most people furrow their brow while in concentration.  I enjoyed reading your post.  It made me think a little.
    Chad Frazer

    1. Hi Chad, I’m glad you enjoyed the post.

      In reference to ‘lowbrow’ / ‘highbrow’ I was referring to the perceived status/value of a text. That no text is better than any other… in the classroom they should be treated equally, with the same degree of objective criticality.

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